Records Observer

News for nerds

What parent does not want to see their progeny grow to be happy, healthy, successful and potentially even – a genius?

It appears that paving an intellectual future for a child might just be more achievable than anyone could have thought.

Studies have shown in the past that names matter more than one might think.

As a matter of fact, last February saw what names could potentially propel a child to stardom and fame.

And now this month, a study has claimed that various other names seem to be destined for a more mentally stimulated individual with a plausible academic path.

Indeed, new data by Edubirdie, an online writing platform, exposed the baby names that are most likely to belong to future geniuses.

Moreover, over 900 names of people with an impressively high intellect from Mensans, Nobel Prize winners, notable scientists were analysed and considered for the study.

From their research, they’ve shared the top 20 baby names most likely to be associated with genius, nine for girls and 11 for boys.

Here’s a look at those for girls…

Top 9 baby girl names set for a future genius
Marie
Elizabeth
Ellen
Susan
Ada
Barbara
Irene
Jane
Nadia

The most common name for a female genius is revealed to be Marie.

A noteworthy Marie is, of course, Nobel Prize Winner Marie Curie, who made huge contributions to cancer studies.

However, the most popular genius name for baby girls in the last 20 years has been Elizabeth, with over 27,000 parents choosing the royal designation.

So what about names for boys? Here’s a look at the list…

Top 11 baby boy names set for a future genius
John
Robert
William
James
Thomas
George
Richard
Charles
Carl
Paul
Micheal

John is undeniably one of the most, if not the most common male name in the English language.

However, John is also the most genius male baby name, with nearly 30 geniuses sporting the moniker.

Notable Johns within the research include John Dalton, the english scientist to first study colour blindness as well as English philosopher, economist, and exponant of utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill.